Participants

Participants

Meet our Leadership Team

Jenny Wüstenberg
Action Chair

Jenny Wüstenberg is Associate Professor of Twentieth Century History and Director of the Centre for Public History, Heritage and Memory at Nottingham Trent University (UK). She is the co-founder and Co-President of the Memory Studies Association, as well as Chair of the COST Action on “Slow Memory: Transformative Practices in Times of Uneven and Accelerating Change” (2021-25). She is the author of Civil Society and Memory in Postwar Germany (Cambridge UP 2017, in German LIT Verlag 2020) and the co-editor, most recently, of Agency in Transnational Memory Politics (with Aline Sierp, Berghahn 2020), the Routledge Handbook of Memory Activism (with Yifat Gutman, 2022) and De-Commemoration: Making Sense of Contemporary Calls to Remove Statues and Change Place Names (with Sarah Gensburger, forthcoming in English with Berghahn, in French with Fayard). She is the co-editor of the book series Worlds of Memory (Berghahn). Her research interests concern the contentious politics of memory, slow-moving change, and methodology in memory studies. She is currently working on a comparative study of how state-driven family separation policies are remembered. Jenny is German, British and Australian and loved living in Canada from 2016-2019.

Joanna Wawrzyniak
Action Co-Chair | WG1 Chair

Joanna Wawrzyniak is Associate Professor and Director of the Center for Research on Social Memory at the Faculty of Sociology, University of Warsaw, Poland. Historian and sociologist by training, she specializes in East-Central European memory processes. Her current projects include research on memories of socialism, neoliberal transformation, and deindustrialization in Poland and contributions to collaborative research on cultural heritage and memory processes in Eastern Europe, Western Europe and East and South Asia. Joanna has long standing expertise in oral history and museum research. She has published, among others, in Heritage and Society; Memory Studies; Contemporary European History; East European Politics and Societies; and Polish Sociological Review. Her books in English include co-edited Regions of Memory: Transnational Formations (forthcoming),  Memory and Change in Europe: Eastern Perspectives (2016); co-authored The Enemy on Display: The Second World War in Eastern European Museums (2015); and Veterans, Victims and Memory: The Politics of the Second World War in Communist Poland (2015). Her most recent co-authored book in Polish Cięcia. Mówiona historia transformacji (The Cuts: Oral History of Transformation, Wyd. Krytyka Polityczna 2020) won an award of POLITYKA weekly for the best historical book of 2020. Her work was supported by grants of the European Commission, national agencies, and fellowships at several European universities. Joanna has been the leader of Work Packages in Horizon 2020 projects, ECHOES and DisTerrMem; member of the Executive Committee of the Memory Studies Association (2019-2022); and the Chair of the Program Committee of the 5th Annual Conference of the Memory Studies Association ‘Convergences’, 2021.

Stefan Berger
WG1 Co-Chair

Stefan Berger is Director of the Institute for Social Movements and Professor of Social History at Ruhr University of Bochum. He is also the Executive Chair of the Foundation History of the Ruhr, a public-private partnership foundation involving the Land NorthRhine Westphalia, the city of Bochum, the university of Bochum, the IGBCE and major employers in the region, above all the Ruhrkohle AG. Its foundation capital is 6 million Euros. Its support research into the history of the Ruhr region and has done important research into the deindustralisation processes of the Ruhr. Berger is also an Honorary Professor at Cardiff University in the UK and a Dinstinguished Short-Term Recurring Visiting Professor at Tianjin Normal University in China. He is the co-editor of Industrial
Heritage and Regional Identity (Routledge, 2018), co-editor of a special issue of The Public Historian on deindustralisation and industrial heritage (2017), editor of Constructing Industrial Pasts (Berghahn Books, 2019) and co-editor of a special edition of Labor on deindustralisation and industrial heritage (1:2019). He has published to date 6 monographs and edited more than 20 edited books and special issues of  journals as well as writing more than 100 articles in peer-reviewed journals and edited collections. He has led large-scale research project funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Programme, the European Science Foundation, the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in Germany and many other funding bodies in the UK and Germany. He has been teaching on deindustrialisation and industrial heritage in comparative perspective at Ruhr University since 2012. The Institute has many postdoctoral researchers and PhD students working on this topic.

The Institute for Social Movements, Ruhr University of Bochum is a central cross-faculty research department of the university with approximately 80 affiliated researchers and its
own dedicated buildings in the university. Its research infrastructure includes the most comprehensive library in Germany on the topics of labour movements, deindustralisation and the structural transformation of regions of heavy industry, an archive (including the archives of the mining, energy and chemical industries union in Germany, the IGBCE, the archives of the administrative body of the Ruhr region, the Regionalverband Ruhr, and many archives relating to the deindustralisation of the Ruhr, e.g. the archives of the International Building Exhibition Emscher Park. The archive also includes over 100 interviews related to the deindustrialisation of the mining industry in the Ruhr. There are meeting rooms, a reading room, a conference and lecture room.

As Full Professor of Social History and Director of the Institute for Social Movements at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (since 2011) he has been centrally involved in a number of externally funded research projects that have sought to compare transnationally the experience of deindustrialization and the role of industrial heritage in those processes of deindustrialization. His position as executive chair of the Foundation History of the Ruhr has allowed him to reach deep into the regional history of the Ruhr as Germany’s foremost area of heavy industry, from which he developed transregional perspectives on the way in which particular narratives of industrialization and deindustrialization have impacted on regional identities, both spatial and social.

He has been running three externally funded graduate schools since 2013: one on
‘Working class education in regions of heavy industry’ funded by the RAG Foundation (2016 – 2020), one on ‘Social change and the worlds of work in Germany between the 1950s and the present day’ (Hans-Böckler Foundation, 2016 – 2020), and one ‘Left wing social movements between the worlds of Social Democracy and Communism in the twentieth century’ (Rosa-Luxemburg Foundation 2013 – 2017). There are currently around 30 PhD students at the Institute of Social Movements, as well as half a dozen postdocs and four permanent members of staff – many of whom are engaged on topics related to the history of deindustrialization, memory studies and labour history as well as the history of historiography. This makes the Institute arguably the primary research institution in Germany dealing with the history of deindustrialization, social movements and labour history. It also owns the largest research collection of books and archival materials related to this topic in Germany – with well over half a million books and considerable archival holdings. The latter comprise important oral history archives, which derive largely from a RAG-funded project in which we interviewed around a hundred employees of the mining industry to find out about their experience of deindustrialization from the late 1950s onwards. He has also co-edited a volume on the realms of memory of the Ruhr region, entitled Zeit-Räume Ruhr: Erinnerungsorte des Ruhrgebiets (Klartext, 2019), which is an in-depth analysis of the memory cultures of the former foremost region of heavy industry in Germany. He is also general editor of a fourvolume handbook-series on the history of mining in Germany published between 2012 and 2015, in which he has authored the article on industrial heritage.
He has considerable experience in managing, as Principal Investigator, large collaborative projects, as he ran European-wide projects, funded by both the European Science Foundation in the 2000s and the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programmes in the 2010s. It involved dozens of core institutional partners and more than 250 academics from 29 European countries.
Since 2017 he has been Honorary Professor at Cardiff University in the UK. Here he has been collaborating of late in particular with Professor Bella Dicks who is also working on aspects of industrial heritage in South Wales. Our cooperation, including cooperation with Marion Fontaine, who is also part of the SSHRC application, resulted in the publication of a joint article in the International Journal of Heritage Studies on ‘Community: a Useful Concept in Heritage Studies?’ (published 17 June 2019). He has also been collaborating with Kevin Passmore and Heiko Feldner at Cardiff University with whom he is general editor of a multi-volume book series entitled Writing History: Theory and Practice, with Bloomsbury, that is concerned with providing links between the theory of history and the practice of historical writing.
He is also general editor, together with Holger Nehring from the University of Sterling, of a book series entitled Palgrave Studies in the History of Social Movements (with Palgrave MacMillan) in which many studies explore the role of social movements in global perspective. As social movements also played an important role in processes of industrialization and deindustrialization, this is a significant topic in the book series, with several volumes addressing it. The Institute for Social Movement’s journal, Moving the Social: Journal of Social History and the History of Social Movements, edited by himself and his colleague Sean Scalmer from the University of Melbourne, is also centrally concerned with topics that are relevant to this application.

As founding president of the German Labour History Association, created in 2017, he is also centrally involved in pushing topics related to this application within German labour history. For the journal German History he has, in 2019, guest edited a special issue on the topic ‘What is New in German Labour History?’ Already his PhD (University of Oxford, 1991) was on comparative labour history and he has also subsequently worked a lot on diverse aspects of transnational and comparative labour history. One recent example is the edited collection on The History of Social Movements in Global Perspective (Palgrave MacMillan, 2017). The comparative approach to history that he has been pursuing throughout his career is also visible in his last monograph but one: The Past as History, which deals with the impact of national histories on national identities in 29 European countries. His last monograph, published with Cambridge University Press in 2022, is entitled ‘History and Identity: How Historical Theory Shapes Historical Practice’.

Natalie Braber
Language coordinator

Natalie Braber is Professor of Linguistics at Nottingham Trent University. Her main research interests are in the field of sociolinguistics, examining accents and dialects in the East Midlands. This research also includes the topic of ‘pit talk’, the language of coal miners in the region. Furthermore, her work focuses on language as heritage and how language is an important aspect of our identity. Her work also includes examining the role of accent judgement as part of earwitness testimony. As well as many articles and chapters on these topics, Natalie has also recently published Sociolinguistics in England (with Sandra Jansen, Palgrave, 2018), East Midlands English (with Jonnie Robinson, Mouton de Gruyter, 2018) and Lexical Variation of an East Midlands Mining Community (Edinburgh University Press, 2022). Natalie has carried out projects with funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the Economic and Social Research Council, National Lottery Heritage Fund, the Arts Council and the British Association of Applied Linguistics and much of this work has focused on working with community groups, artists, musicians and writers.

Steven Brown
WG2 Chair

Steven Brown is Professor of Health and Organizational Psychology at Nottingham Trent University. His research interests are around inpatient and community-based experiences of mental health service-use and social remembering amongst marginalised groups. He is author of a number of monographs, the most recent being Vital Memory and Affect: Living with a difficult past (with Paula Reavey, 2015, Routledge). He is co-editor of the journal Memory Studies.

Frédéric Clavert
WG7 Chair | Science Communication Coordinator

Frédéric Clavert is an Assistant Professor in Contemporary European History at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH, University of Luxembourg). Holder of a PhD in Contemporary History, he completed studies in political sciences and history in Strasbourg and Leeds. He previously worked as a researcher in Strasbourg, at the Centre Virtuel de la Connaissance sur l’Europe (CVCE) in Luxembourg and at the University of Lausanne. He was also a research engineer at Paris-Sorbonne University for the Writing a new history of Europe Laboratory of Excellence (LabEx EHNE). Since 2008, he became an active member of the digital humanities community and gradually turned his attention to the study of the relationship between historians and their primary sources in the digital age on the one hand, and the use of massive data from web platforms and web archive in memory studies on the other. He led the #ww1 project around the Centenary of the Great War on Twitter and is also interested in the collective memory aspects of the current sanitary crisis. With Caroline Muller (Université Rennes 2), he is co-editor of the online book Le Goût de l’archive à l’ère numérique (The allure of the archive in the digital era). He is also managing editor of the Journal of Digital History.

Stef Craps
WG5 Chair

Stef Craps is a professor of English literature at Ghent University in Belgium, where he directs the Cultural Memory Studies Initiative. His research interests lie in twentieth-century and contemporary literature and culture, memory and trauma studies, postcolonial theory, and ecocriticism and environmental humanities. He is the author of Postcolonial Witnessing: Trauma Out of Bounds (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013) and Trauma and Ethics in the Novels of Graham Swift: No Short-Cuts to Salvation (Sussex Academic Press, 2005), a co-author of the New Critical Idiom volume Trauma (Routledge, 2020), and a co-editor of Memory Unbound: Tracing the Dynamics of Memory Studies (Berghahn, 2017). He has also (co-)edited special issues of journals including American Imago, Studies in the Novel, and Criticism on topics such as ecological grief, climate change fiction, and transcultural Holocaust memory.

Rick Crownshaw
WG5 Co-Chair

Dr Rick Crownshaw teaches American literature in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of The Afterlife of Holocaust Memory in Contemporary Literature and Culture (Palgrave Macmillan 2010), as well as numerous articles on American literature, memory studies, and trauma studies. He is the editor of Transcultural Memory (Routledge 2014), and co-editor of The Future of Memory (Berghahn 2010, 2013). He is currently working on a monograph, Remembering the Anthropocene in Contemporary American Fiction, which focuses on, among other things, the potential of cultural memory and trauma studies in analyzing literary narratives of climate change, extinction, pollution and toxicity, the resourcing of war, American petrocultures, and post-oil imaginaries.

Orli Fridman
WG4 Co-Chair

Orli Fridman is an associate professor at the Faculty of Media and Communications (FMK), Singidunum University where she heads the Center for Comparative Conflict Studies (CFCCS). She also is the academic director of the School for International Training (SIT) learning center in Belgrade. Her recent publications include: Memory Activism and Digital Practices after Conflict:Unwanted Memories (Amsterdam University Press, 2022 in press); ‘Online Transnational Memory Activism and Commemoration: The Case of the White Armband Day’ in Agency in Transnational Memory Politics (Berghahn Books, 2020, with Katarina Ristić); ‘Conflict, Memory, and Memory Activism: Dealing with Difficult Pasts’ in The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Peace and Conflict Studies (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020); ‘Peace formation from below: The “mirëdita, dobardan!” festival as an alternative to everyday nationalism’ (Nations and Nationalism, 2020).

Sarah Gensburger
WG3 Chair

Sarah Gensburger is Full Research Professor at the French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). Trained in sociology, political science and history, she has been working at the intersection of memory studies, remembrance public policy analysis and micro-history of the Holocaust. Her on-going research project, entitled The Memory Trap, investigates the relationship between neoliberalism, the crisis of the welfare state and the contemporary memory boom. She has published ten books, most of which available in several languages. Among them the most recent ones in English are : Beyond Memory. Can we really learn from the past?, Palgrave, 2020, with Sandrine Lefranc; Memory on my doorstep. Chronicles of the Bataclan Beighborhood (Paris, 2015-2016), Leuven University Press, 2019. In 2021, she was elected President of the international Memory Studies Association.

Saygun Gökarıksel
WG3 Co-Chair

Saygun Gökarıksel is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the Department of Sociology, Boğaziçi University. His writing and research interests concern the themes of law, violence, memory, and politics, with a focus on the intersection of culture and political economy and the critical theoretical perspectives from the South and East. His current research focuses on the judicial and ethical-political reckoning with the communist past in Eastern Europe in the post-Cold War context of neoliberal globalization and right-wing authoritarian populism. His writings have appeared in journals and blogs including Comparative Studies in Society and History, South Atlantic Quarterly, Dialectical Anthropology, Jadaliyya, and LeftEast. He is currently finishing the book manuscript, tentatively entitled Moral Autopsy: A Critical Anthropology of Reckoning with the Communist Past in Poland’s Neoliberal Democracy.

Deniz Gundogan Ibrisim
Grant Awarding Coordinator

Dr. Deniz Gundogan Ibrisim is a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at the Gender and Women’s Studies Center of Excellence (SU Gender) at Sabancı University. She graduated from Istanbul University with a bachelor’s degree in English Literature. She holds two MA degrees in Gender Studies from Istanbul University and Central European University. She received her PhD in Comparative Literature from Washington University with her dissertation entitled “Trauma, Survival and Survivance in Contemporary Anglophone and Turkish Literature: Materiality Beyond Mind.”

As a comparatist literary scholar by training, her research lies at the intersection of Anglophone postcolonial literature, Middle Eastern literature, cultural trauma and memory studies, and environmental humanities. In addition to a comparative focus on trauma and violence representation in postcolonial Anglophone and Middle Eastern literatures, her research interests include gender and sexuality studies, narrative theory, feminist and queer narratology, animism, and critical posthumanism. Her research has been supported by the Fulbright-IIE, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s Sawyer Seminars, The Institute for World Literature (IWL), and several Washington University fellowships. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals such as European Review, Intertexts, The Journal of World Literature (BRILL), Monograf, Varlık, Birikim, as well as edited volumes such as The Routledge Companion to Literature and Trauma; Animals, Plants, and Landscapes: An Ecology of Turkish Literature and Film; Subaltern Women’s Narratives: Strident Voices, Dissenting Bodies; Mapping World Anglophone Studies: English in a World of Strangers. She is a co-author of Gaflet: Türkçe Edebiyatın Cinsiyetçi Sinir Uçları (Turkish), (Metis, 2019). Gundogan Ibrisim’s research and teaching is shaped by values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. She is committed to making higher education accessible, inspiring, and a tool for social justice for all students. In addition to her fields of study, she also incorporates her background in translation studies into her teaching practice and understands translation as a vibrant tool to make cross-border traveling of knowledge production possible.

Gundogan Ibrisim serves as the official Management Committee Member for Turkey of the Cost Action Project: CA20105 – Slow Memory: Transformative Practices for Times of Uneven and Accelerating Change (2021-2025). She also acts as the Grant Writing Coordinator in this action.

Kateřina Králová
WG2 Co-Chair

Kateřina Králová is Associate Professor of Contemporary History and former Head of the Department of Russian and East European Studies (2017-2021), Institute of International Studies, Charles University (CUNI). As a historian, her work focuses on reconciliation with the Nazi past, the Holocaust, the Greek Civil War, conflict-related migration, and post-war reconstruction. By giving voice to war survivors and their eyewitness accounts, she empowers and flourishes the memory of “invisible” non-elites. K. Králová, analumna of Phillips University Marburg, has been awarded major international fellowships, including the Alexander von Humboldt, the Vienna Wiesenthal Institute, a USHMM fellowship, and a Fulbright Fellowship at Yale University, and has thus conducted a substantial part
of her research abroad. In addition, she received the 2017 Scholarly Society Award for Scientists Under 40 for her research achievements. She isone of the founders of the Herzl Center for Israel Studies at CUNI, the 4EU+ Alliance Winter School “Memory in Conflict”, the CENTRAL project “Institutionalizing Memory in Post-Conflict Societies”, and others. Before joining COST-Action Slow Memory, she served as anMC member of the COST-Action COMPACT project (2015-2020)and local organizer of its final meeting. In 2022, the Claims Conference supported her application for Holocaust Teaching Partnership, which has been awarded to CUNI. K. Králová is the author of Das Vermächtnis der Besatzung: Deutsch-griechische Beziehungen seit 1940 (Böhlau, 2016; BpB 2017), numerous articles and volumes in Czech, English, German and Greek, and is an active member of several editorial boards. The manuscript of her second book on Holocaust survivors in Greece is currently under review by a US university press.

Vjollca Krasniqi
WG6 Chair

Dr. Vjollca Krasniqi is a sociologist. She is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Philosophy, and Faculty of Arts, University of Prishtina. She holds a Ph.D. in Social Work from the University of Ljubljana, an M.Sc. degree in Gender, Development, and Globalization from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and a BA degree in Philosophy and Sociology from the University of Prishtina. Her research interests are gender, nation-building, human rights, post-war justice, and social policy.  She has led and participated in numerous international research projects and published widely on these issues.She is a member of the steering committee of the Memory Studies Association Regional Group South East Europe.Her recent publications include: Are we putting human rights into practice in Kosovo (co-author with Jane McPherson and Tatiana Villarreal-Otalora 2021); Skirts and Words: The Art of Acknowledgment, War Time Rape and Albanian Nationhood in Kosovo (co-author with Ivor Sokolić and Denisa Kostovicova 2020); Domestic Violence: Gendered State Rationality and Women’s Activism in Kosovo (2019); Migration and Human Rights in Kosovo: Perspectives for Social Work Education (2019). She is the co-chair of the Training and Capacity Building Working Group.

Sara Dybris McQuaid
WG4 Chair

Sara Dybris McQuaid, Associate Professor at Aarhus University. She is a trained contemporary historian and political scientist who works mostly in the interdisciplinary fields of peace and conflict studies and memory studies. Herresearch pivots around how collectives remember, forget and archive their past, particularly as part of conflict and peacebuilding processes and she has published extensively on this in the context of the ‘post-conflict’ peace process in Northern Ireland. She is currently working on dynamics of ‘multi-level memory governance’ across transnational‘Administrations of Memory’. Her recent publications include ‘Politics and Narrative in Ireland’s Decade of Commemorations’ (Co-editor Fearghal McGarry) and ‘Administrations of Memory: Transcending the Nation and Bringing Back the State in Memory Studies’ (Co-editor Sarah Gensburger). She teaches in the English Degree Programme; the BA in Conflict and Narrative and the MA in Intercultural Studies at Aarhus University. She is a founding member of the research collective Centre for Resolution of International Conflicts at University of Copenhagen and she is on the MC of the EU COST action Slow Memory: Transformative Practices for Times of Uneven and Accelerating Change, where she also co-directs the working group “Transformation of Conflict”.

Vjeran Pavlaković
STSM Coordinator

Vjeran Pavlaković is an associate professor at the Department of Cultural Studies at the University of Rijeka, Croatia. He received his Ph.D. in History in 2005 from the University of Washington, and has published articles on cultural memory, transitional justice in the former Yugoslavia, and the Spanish Civil War. He is a co-editor of the volumeFraming the Nation and Collective Identity in Croatia (Routledge, 2019), and other recent publications include “The Legacy of War and Nation-Building in Croatia since 1990,” in Balkan Legacies: The Long Shadow of Conflict andIdeological Experiment in Southeastern Europe (Purdue UP, 2021), and “Memory Politics inthe Former Yugoslavia” in Yearbook of the Institute of East-Central Europe (2020). He wasthe lead researcher on the Memoryscapes project as part of Rijeka’s European Capital ofCulture in 2020 and a co-founder of the Cres Summer School on Transitional Justice andMemory Politics. Current research includes transnationalmuralization of conflict and a history of Dalmatian immigrants in the American Southwest.

Chris Reynolds
Education coordinator

Chris Reynolds is Professor of Contemporary European History and Memory Studies at Nottingham Trent University. His main research interests are in relation to the events of 1968 from a French, Northern Irish and European perspective. In addition to a wide range of articles and chapters on these topics, he is the author of Memories of May ’68: France’s Convenient Consensus (University of Wales Press 2011) and Sous les pavés…The Troubles: Northern Ireland, France and the European Collective Memory of 1968 (Peter Lang 2015). He has also led a major collaboration with National Museums Northern Ireland on the Northern Irish events of 1968.

Yilmaz Vurucu
WG6 Co-Chair

Yilmaz Vurucu boasts over 20 years of international experience in producing, writing and directing films, documentaries, and advertising campaigns. In recent years, he‘s focussed on capturing and disseminating the stories and efforts of communities, initiatives and organizations that promote social inclusion, urban regeneration, solidarity, circular economy models and sustainability via projects such as the Open Heritage documentary series, Begegnungsorte, and Wonderland Films.
Also an award-winning filmmaker, his work covers a wide range of subjects, ranging from the ethics of technological development and AI in his most recent film Daddy’s Arbitrage (2021) to sustainable urban development in “the Sea In me” (2010), social inclusion and justice in “borders” (2011), social inequality, class struggle and family abuse in “Dr. Zack” (2010). Yilmaz is also active in numerous EU funded projects, the most notably The Generative Commons Living Lab (which researches and provides tools for generating the commons in our cities), Open Heritage (A project that identifies best practices of adaptive heritage reuse), and AGORA (a project that created instruments for the reintroduction of vacant/underused space into the productive urban value chain in municipalities along the Danube River).
His role in such projects is mostly to act as a bridge between academic research and in-the-field practice: he‘s initiated webinars and expert exchange programs, aided in knowledge capitalization, streamlined dissemination through social media and initiated inter-disciplinary activities that promote awareness.
He is also currently working on a feature documentary highlighting community-initiated transformation of urban heritage sites: historical buildings that are being repurposed for community use. He brings an interdisciplinary perspective and practical experience to the projects he collaborates on.

Banner Credit: Sarah Gensburger

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